Boston Public Market

My city finally has a building dedicated to act as an all year farmers’ market.  And yes, I went on opening weekend.

It was busy.  Not everything is open yet.  Some vendors were hidden between other vendor booths (hello Soluna Garden Farm!), but I did my best to explore.  I didn’t buy anything today but I’ll probably come back next week with my sister so I didn’t want to stress over it.  (Plus, there are things in my freezer that I should defrost and cook up before I stock up on some locally raised meats.)

(I miss having a meat farm share.)

Overall reaction, I am very happy to have this building in the general area.  I commute by public transit mostly, and Boston Public Market is right next to Haymarket station.  The Kitchen entrance is closest to the station but I didn’t see any demonstrations going on.  Looking at their calendar, it looks like it’ll be a few more weeks before that space sees any real use.

There’s a wall in the market area called the Cookbook Exchange.  The idea is to take a cookbook/magazine, and leave a cookbook/magazine.  Writing in the books is encouraged!  Then the next borrower will know what people tried out.

Taza chocolate wasn’t open yet and neither was the wine vendor.  But there was a beer section, two meat sellers, cider donuts, Union Square donuts, a honey seller, a seller of bowls and boards from local trees, etc.

Anyway, have a mini-tour:

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https://bostonpublicmarket.org/

https://bostonpublicmarket.org/blog/848/boston-public-market-cookbook-exchange

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No, I’m not dead… but yes I kind of suck

Between school and the craziness that my day job has become, I’ve been neglecting my blog.  I have a backlog of pictures and things I want to write, and, if I’m lucky, something will go up this weekend.

One of the things that I wanted to write about was my brand-new-to-me high speed blender.  One of the things that I plan to do with said blender is experiment with the recipes from BLEND.  What is BLEND?  It’s a series of e-books for smoothies by Simply Artisanal that I think sounds really promising.  I’ve purchased, from my own pocket, the Basics e-book and Summer, Volume 1.  They’ve started an affiliate program, and I thought that it couldn’t hurt to join.  Here’s my affiliate link:

Click here to visit Simply Artisanal.

What else?  Oh!  Graze box invite codes.  I don’t think there’s a limit anymore?  Anyway, if you would like an invite code, please comment with your email address.

I think that’s it for now.  I just wanted to let you know that I’m still around!  (^_^)

A moment of silence for my BlendMaster, Jr. # 5972B

To my much loved Hamilton Beach BlendMaster, Jr. # 5972B,

You were given to me by my second oldest sister back in the days when I was not such a food nerd. I bet you were just a $15-$20 product, but I felt like I was on the road to cooking awesome food when I unwrapped your box. (It was Christmas, I think.) You only had a two year warranty, and, to be honest, I didn’t think you’d last past it.

You were mine before immersion blenders were on everyone’s wedding registry. I think we were at around ten years together. You helped me through dental surgery, *several* times, and I am forever grateful. I thought we’d last into February at least, but it was not to be.

Rest in peace.

 

Please don’t hate me for replacing you with a colorful Cuisinart.

Cooking from creative, young minds

disclaimer – I don’t know the “who” behind these recipes. All I know is that they were created by young grade school kids (maybe 1st grade?) back in 2000 as a Mother’s Day project.

I was talking about baking with my 7 year old niece in the office building kitchen when a colleague asked me if I wanted to read his friend’s kid’s cookbook.

wha? Ok, I’m game.

Apparently stashed at his desk, Tom quickly produced a stack of photocopied paper showed signs of love and age.

I read every page in “the cookbook.”  And I can’t stop laughing. Here are a couple of my favorites, exactly copied:

RAINBOW ICE CREAM
15 cups of sugar
17 cups of milk
4 eggs
1 cup of red
1 cup of yellow
1 cup of green
1 cup of blue
1 cup of orange
Put in the bowls.  Then you eat it.  First put the ice cream in the fridge then eat it. Continue reading

the cookbooks we own

This is the most random post I’ve ever made on this blog. Between my sister (Stealth Eater) and I, there are a lot of cookbooks in our arsenal. Most of the time, our tastes in books do not crossover. Once in a blue moon, they do.

This will be a list of everything we own. I’ll update it whenever appropriate/possible. My sister has more books than I do, or so we think. I have some cookbooks stored in a couple of different places, but the books I’m listing here are on my “current bookshelf.” Maybe I’ll add the other cookbooks at some point.  This list of books is mostly so that we can avoid buying duplicates (which we’ve done!), and start borrowing from each other. (^_^)

Continue reading

what to buy and when

I thought this was pretty nifty for anyone looking to cook with seasonal ingredients. The Center for Health and the Global Environment at Harvard Medical School has published a quick reference guide for the New England area (and another guide for the Mid-Atlantic area) that gives a run-down of the fruits and vegetables that are in season by month. The aim here is to encourage people to purchase and eat more locally grown produce.
http://chge.med.harvard.edu/programs/food/pocket_guides.html

The full New England guide can be found on:
http://chge.med.harvard.edu/programs/food/food_ne.html
which includes hyperlinks to detailed information, like nutritional info and storage info, about the produce of your choice.

It’s hard to find, but there are a few recipes posted as well.  Luckily for you, I did all the sleuthing so you don’t have to.
http://chge.med.harvard.edu/programs/food/recipes.html
There are even two recipes from Dan Barber of Blue Hill.  Have fun! ^_^