Feeds:
Posts
Comments

I’ve had the awesome opportunity to cook with organic, grassfed ghee from Pure Indian Foods as well as their cultured organic, grassfed ghee.  (Yes, this is yet-another blog post that is sitting on my to-do-list.)

I love it.  It’s not cheap, but they last a long time.  I’ve had oil go rancid on me and it’s a very cruddy moment when you have to chuck it in the trash.

My mom recently cooked with some of my ghee, and then asked for a jar for herself.  I picked up Swad ghee based on the recommendation of the BFF (who is Indian and therefore I value her opinion on the subject).  I’m curious how it will taste.  Pure Indian Foods is twice as expensive, but it’s really lovely stuff.  

Yes, I could make my own ghee, but I’m lazy to be honest.  Maybe if I come across a sale on grassfed butter then I’ll do it.

At least I have plenty of time to think about it.  I only just opened my jar of the cultured ghee.

Any readers have thoughts on this?

Between school and the craziness that my day job has become, I’ve been neglecting my blog.  I have a backlog of pictures and things I want to write, and, if I’m lucky, something will go up this weekend.

One of the things that I wanted to write about was my brand-new-to-me high speed blender.  One of the things that I plan to do with said blender is experiment with the recipes from BLEND.  What is BLEND?  It’s a series of e-books for smoothies by Simply Artisanal that I think sounds really promising.  I’ve purchased, from my own pocket, the Basics e-book and Summer, Volume 1.  They’ve started an affiliate program, and I thought that it couldn’t hurt to join.  Here’s my affiliate link:

Click here to visit Simply Artisanal.

What else?  Oh!  Graze box invite codes.  I don’t think there’s a limit anymore?  Anyway, if you would like an invite code, please comment with your email address.

I think that’s it for now.  I just wanted to let you know that I’m still around!  (^_^)

For people unfamiliar with me, I like and use Blue Apron.  It’s a grocery/recipe/meal delivery service that I pay for when I’m feeling self-indulgent (which is not too often, to be honest).  Once you’ve been a Blue Apron account holder long enough, you get the chance to send a free box to a friend.  Of course, the person you’re sending the box to must be new to Blue Apron.  I won’t lie, it’s a way to rope in new customers.  That’s the crappy part but don’t forget… I actually like the service so that must say something good about it.

Here’s the first time I wrote about Blue Apron:

http://awesomesauceeats.wordpress.com/2013/01/11/blue-apron-part-1-of-3/

Anyway, I have three invites with a free box of food sitting on my account.  Rather than just letting them sit there, I thought I’d offer the trial membership to a reader who wants it.  I’m not getting reimbursed in anyway from the company.  This is a service they give to all of their long standing customers. I want to be upfront about that.  I will also warn you that you will need to open an account with a credit card in order to receive the free box of food.  This isn’t a giveaway so much as it is an invite, but I’m using a rafflecopter giveaway widget to make it easier for me to administer this.  Once you have your free box of food, I recommend that you log into your Blue Apron account and check for future deliveries.  Blue Apron will assume you want a delivery unless you shut it off.

Does this sound a lot of work?  Maybe?  I thought it was inconvenient when I first signed up, but now I’m pretty accustomed to it.

The quality of the food is great, and I’ve had good results overall from the recipes.

Three random entries will win the invite.  Please make sure the Blue Apron delivers to your location before you enter.

http://www.blueapron.com/pages/frequently-asked-questions

http://www.blueapron.com/assets/learn-more/blue-apron-ship-zones.jpg

Here’s the link to the rafflecopter widget… because I’m too brain-dead from homework to figure out why it won’t embed correctly.  This will end on December 20, 2013.

http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/2144a50/

… feed yourself.

Case in point, Trader Joe’s coconut cashews:

coconutcashew

O.M.G.

Pure love right there.  I bought a bag to try out on Sunday.  I might already be halfway through the bag, 36 hours later.

While I was at Trader Joe’s, I also perused the cold cuts section.  I was stopped in my tracks by a package of Spanish brand deli cuts.  I tried to walk away, really I did, but the chorizo called to me.  Yes, I bought an entire package of sampler deli cuts just for the chorizo.  I’m looking forward to trying the other cuts too, but chorizo is a personal favorite.

While I was supposed to be studying (yes, studying… holy cow I’m cursing my desire for career development), I made chorizo pizza instead.

DSC01141-1

The sauce was one I whipped up with things I had on hand.  I don’t think it would taste particularly well on pasta, but it tasted fine on my pizza.

Emergency Pizza Sauce 1.0

8oz can of plain tomato sauce
1 tsp of dried herbs (oregano, basil, combo, or cheat and use an Italian mix like I did)
1 tsp onion powder
1 tsp tomato paste
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1/8 tsp red pepper flakes

Mix everything up, and set aside.  I suggest making this first so that the flavors can sit and make friendly while you go make your dough and let it rise.

Depending on how heavy handed you like your sauce, this is enough for one pizza or barely enough for two.

As for the dough, I decided to use the measurements given on a recipe from Sorted Food.  I used a bit more yeast though, just 1/2 tsp seems too little to me.  My kitchen is getting cold, so it took my dough a full hour to rise enough to my liking while parked near the oven light bulb.

I baked it at 475F until the color was to my liking.  My crust wasn’t very chewy but that’s my own fault.  I used all-purpose flour since I’m all out of bread flour.

DSC01142-1

In a word, bliss.

I also tried my hand at making bread in a slow cooker.

DSC01140-1

I totally forgot to take a picture of the bread when it was done cooking, so all you get is a picture of my slow cooker lined in parchment.  I took the instructions from the kitchn, and the only change I made was to set up the parchment before plopping in the dough.  My 4 quart cooker took about 2 hours on high.  I’m not 100% sure on the amount of time because I lost track.  I set a timer for 1 hour and then started to check every 15 minutes or so.  Once I had reached 195F, I turned it off, put the loaf on a sheet pan, and broiled the top for five minutes so that the top didn’t look pathetic.

(For the record, I used the all spelt bread recipe that I posted a while back.)

Flavor-wise, it’s not brilliant.  The dough doesn’t even need to go through a rising stage.  It will rise as it cooks.  It’s a bit denser, but the cooking method works.  I might recommend letting it rise some in the slow cooker before turning it on, but whatever.  I don’t see myself utilizing the slow cooker method during the winter (hey, a hot oven helps to warm my apartment) but this is definitely what I’m going to do during the summer.  I hate baking bread in the summer, and then I really miss it.  (I can’t stand store bought bread anymore if I can help it.)

And on that note, I’d like to point out that I need to read two chapters about Java because I didn’t do it over the weekend.

Reference Links:

http://sortedfood.com/#!/pizza/

http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-bread-in-the-slow-cooker-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-192421

(This post is being published later than I had intended.  Sorry!)

I went to the second Let’s Talk About Food festival last weekend.  This year, the festival was located in Copley Square.

DSC01112-1

DSC01110-1

(I bet you didn’t know why iceberg lettuce is called iceberg.)

Continue Reading »

Yogurt salad dressing

I have a confession – I’m not a huge fan of Greek yogurt.  So, when I was given a free tub of Fage yogurt, I struggled for ideas.  This became a struggle for healthy ideas, because this happened not too long ago:

DSC01084-1

DSC01093-1

DSC01098-1

Continue Reading »

Has anyone tried to make ice cream with a food processor?  I finally did.

I have an ice cream maker, on permanent loan, that I never use.  I used to keep the insert in my freezer, but that was just taking up room so I finally took it out.  Of course!… when I finally  want to make ice cream, I can’t use the ice cream maker.

I first heard about using a food processor to make ice cream on thekitchn.com, but seriouseats.com actually beat them to the punch.  Basically, you make your ice cream per the recipe, freeze it as fast as possible, and then place it into a food processor to whip in air.

Kenji from Serious Eats froze his custard base into ice cube trays, but I don’t have spare trays or enough of them.  (Most ice cream recipes make 1 quart.)  Jeni Britton, in the video she did for CHOW, recommended putting the custard base in a large resealable food bag and laying it flat in the freezer.

DSC01069-1

My ice cream base was this:

two cans of full fat coconut milk
1 3/4c cane sugar
1/2c fresh mint

I brought the sugar and coconut milk to a simmer, cut the heat, and then let the mint steep about 15 minutes.  This was transferred to a ziploc bag, moved onto a small tray to lie down flat, and cooled first in the fridge.  After about an hour, I moved the tray into the freezer for  4-5 hours.

(Note – when you’re pouring your ice cream in liquid form into the food bag, make sure that you stand the bag up in a container large enough to hold one quart of liquid.  I stood my bag up in a container that was a little small, and made a mess.)

When it’s ready, put the ice cream into a food processor.  Run the food processor and scrap down the ice cream as needed until it’s an even and smooth consistency.  Move the ice cream into a container for the freezer (I just reused the food bag), and let freeze again before eating.

DSC01070-1

Overall, it’s a bit icier than traditional ice cream but maybe that’s because I was making a dairy free ice cream.  (I was making a dairy free ice cream out of laziness, and for no other reason to be honest.)  I would say that it’s a bit more like gelato in texture.

As for the flavor of what I made, I needed more mint.  I *love* ice cream made with real mint.  Before my mint plant dies as the weather gets cooler, I should harvest all the leaves and try again with a traditional custard base.  However, it’s still quite delicious.  I’d be happy to make it again.  (Although, I might cut back the sugar next time.)

Reference Links:

http://www.chow.com/videos/show/chow-tips/90744/an-easy-way-to-make-ice-cream-in-your-food-processor

http://sweets.seriouseats.com/2010/07/how-to-make-ice-cream-without-an-ice-cream-maker-the-food-lab.html

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 68 other followers