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Posts Tagged ‘recipes’

(Nandu is on the right; Carles Gaig is on the left.)

It was a quiet evening for a SEAS lecture tonight. I think the room was only 2/3rds full. I suppose it’s because the guest speakers were Nandu Jubany and Carles Gaig, both Spanish chefs without the fame of Jose Andres or Grant Achatz. I say “if you didn’t make it to the lecture, your loss.”

I missed out on Nandu Jubany last year and regretted it. I heard whisperings of his delicious garlic aioli, and when I heard he was returning this year, I was determined to show up.

Recipe #1, from Jubany, milk mayonnaise
**Important – the temperature of your ingredients should be the same.** (since this is a mayo, room temp or slightly colder temps are fine)
300g milk
700g neutral flavored oil (Jubany used sunflower oil)
10g minced chives
10g minced parsley
15g wasabi powder
For hardware – immersion blender and a tall enough container

Throw everything together into your container. In short bursts on low, turn the immersion blender on and off. Gradually, let the immersion blender stay on. Then, you can set it on a higher speed, and slowly move the immersion blender up and down. You want to incorporate the un-blended ingredients sitting at the top at a controlled pace into the blended ingredients at the bottom. When everything is successfully blended, you are done. (more…)

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disclaimer – I don’t know the “who” behind these recipes. All I know is that they were created by young grade school kids (maybe 1st grade?) back in 2000 as a Mother’s Day project.

I was talking about baking with my 7 year old niece in the office building kitchen when a colleague asked me if I wanted to read his friend’s kid’s cookbook.

wha? Ok, I’m game.

Apparently stashed at his desk, Tom quickly produced a stack of photocopied paper showed signs of love and age.

I read every page in “the cookbook.”  And I can’t stop laughing. Here are a couple of my favorites, exactly copied:

RAINBOW ICE CREAM
15 cups of sugar
17 cups of milk
4 eggs
1 cup of red
1 cup of yellow
1 cup of green
1 cup of blue
1 cup of orange
Put in the bowls.  Then you eat it.  First put the ice cream in the fridge then eat it. (more…)

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(haha, another entry that I’m posting later than I had originally intended.  CSA #4 is tomorrow… I wonder what it will be!)

“Things are still pretty green at the farm. Until the cukes and zucchini start yielding the shares tend to be pretty light and leafy. But lots of goodies on the way: tomatoes and sweet corn are growing steadily, onion are growing up fast, melons are on the way, and sugar snap peas are just around the corner now. This week we’ll be rolling out garlic scapes, the twisty goofy looking flower heads of the garlic plant. 100% of the garlic plant is edible, including the scapes, which need to come off the plant this time of year anyways. If you leave the flower on the plant, it devotes a lot of its energy to seed, which means less for the bulb. By taking off the flower, we redirect the plants’ energy towards growing a big fat bulb at the base, which is what we prefer. Scapes are actually super versatile, taste exactly the same as garlic cloves, but less intense. Use them any way you would normally use garlic. You can also make some bangin’ green pesto with them, or just hit them with olive oil and salt and roast them in the oven like you would asparagus. They mellow out upon roasting and are super tasty just eaten whole.

This is our best guess of what will come in the Stone Soup shares this week.

Please remember that sometimes we can’t harvest exactly what we expect!

Lettuce (head) 1
Garlic Scapes (lb) 0.25
Herbs (bunch) 1
Arugula (bunch) 1”

SE decided to only keep the lettuce. She let me keep the herbs (purple basil), arugula, and garlic scapes. Ok, I called dibs on the garlic scapes, but I would have thought that she wanted the arugula.

Poor arugula, it has been insect-chomped to kingdom come.

So, what did I do with this week’s CSA so far? I decided to take the garlic scapes (I had about 3.3 oz in reality), the basil (about 1 oz.), two handfuls of pine nuts, a pinch of salt, extra virgin olive oil (1/3 c. + 1/4 c.) and squeeze of half a lemon to my blender. Garlic scape pesto! I think I used just a tad too much oil and pine nuts, but that’s ok.

The true taste test?  I took the garlic scape pesto to pasta.  It was very green tasting.  Not in a bad way, but I realize now that I should have added cheese.  Plus, I’m such a basil pesto fan that I found myself wanting to add more basil to my garlic scape pesto.

I have a whole jar of this pesto, so I’ll be trying to think up of other applications.  I think the next one might be pizza.  (^_^)

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… AKA corned beef and leftovers, part 3

Leftover idea #2? Corned beef hash okayu.


Wait, okayu? Yes, okayu (also known as jook, juk, congee, rice porriage, etc).  This idea is completely my brain child, and it’s one of my better ideas.  (One of my bad ideas?  Purposely swapping 1/3 of the oil for extra virgin olive oil in a brownie recipe out of pure curiosity… yeah, don’t do that.)

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So, now that I’ve got about half of the corned beef and cabbage hanging out in my refrigerator, what should I do next?

Leftover dish #1? Corned beef hash.

This was pretty good. The only downside to my hash was that it aggravated my TMJ.  (Was it the hash or the slightly overcooked corned beef that was the culprit? I will not know until next year when I make more). You want equal portions of cooked potatoes and corned beef. My amounts were approximately:

2 cups potatoes (quarter and boil for about 12 minutes before using them in the hash)
2 cups of corned beef
1 bunch of scallions, white parts and some of the green parts (just don’t use any green parts that look sad)
freshly ground black pepper, to taste
(makes about 4 servings)

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Oh, wow… I’m posting something? With pictures?!

This past weekend I made the avocado pasta sauce recipe as found on the Sara Moulton website. I used 3 cups of whole milk rather than four, and used more cheese than originally listed (I had trouble reducing the sauce and still wanted the right texture). I also didn’t have tomatoes on hand. In the future, I’ll probably replace the tomatillas with green bell peppers just because it’s more readily available.

The pasta sauce also makes for a good salad dressing. Yum.

a close up of my dinner

my dinner

Here’s the link to the recipe, http://www.saramoulton.com/recipebox.php?id=76&cat_id=17

~ Mikan

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Yet again, I have no pictures of the bread that I made this weekend.  However, I figured that I would post about it before Asano-mama gives me flack for not mentioning it.

This bread recipe was the second one that I had ever tried (my first was rosemary focaccia that needed two attempts – I guarantee that everyone kills the yeast in their first breadmaking attempts).  Beth Hensperger’s recipe is a great recipe for beginners in general.  It’s a little faster than other bread recipes and pretty hard to mess up since kneading is not much of an issue.  It’s available on epicurious.com and I am reposting it here with a few minor (really minor) changes. 

Ingredients:
1 tablespoon instant yeast  (I use SAF)
3 tablespoons firmly packed light brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger (use good quality ground ginger – the whole world depends on it)
1/2 cup warm water (comfortably warm to your skin – don’t go too hot or you’ll kill your yeast)
1 can (12 ounces) evaporated milk at room temperature
2 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons vegetable oil (I used a light flavored olive oil)
4 1/2 cups (exact measure) unbleached all-purpose flour

… for equipment, I prefer to use one large mixing bowl, my dough whisk (a wooden spoon is fine), and one bread loaf pan (standard size).

Since I’m working with SAF instant, I like to mix the flour and the yeast together first.  Activating the yeast is not needed.  I took a bread baking class once upon a time, and the instructor recommended mixing the yeast and flour first always.  You don’t want the yeast to come into direct contact with water/salt/sugar too quickly.  I forget why exactly, but I can make up a reason if asked for one. 

Then go ahead and throw in the rest of the ingredients.  Mix it was well as you possibly can with your whisk/spoon.  I promise that it’s going to get very sticky and thick quickly and that you’ll give up and use your hands shortly after.  Oil your hands before touching the dough.  It helps against the stickiness some.  Ms. Hensperger seems to be of the opinion that you can beat the dough for 140 vigorous strokes.  Maybe you can do it, but  I can’t.  It never seems to matter in the end though.  You will have a very sticky dough that will look ugly.  It’ll never have the smooth satiny look that other bread doughs have.

 Take the dough and put it into your greased loaf pan.  Do your best to spread it out evenly.  Take some plastic wrap, spray a little oil on it (or coat it on with your favorite silicon basting brush as I do), and loosely cover the dough and loaf pan with the oil side down.

Let the dough rise.  It can take as little as 45 minutes if you’re lucky.  If you’re me, it takes an hour and twenty minutes.  You want the dough to have risen enough to be almost even with the rim of the pan, and just lightly lifting up the plastic wrap. 

 Preheat the oven to  350F.

 Bake the bread in the lower half of the oven for 40-45 minutes.  The bread should sound hallow if you tap it and the center should be 200F if you have a reliable thermometer.  It took about 50 minutes in my oven.  Your oven may vary.

When you take it out, let it cool for a little bit.  Five minutes should be good.  And then, slide the bread out.  Let it cool completely (or as long as you can before you go crazy with a need for fresh bread).  Even then, I bet the center will still be warm.

Things I like about this bread?  The crust is good; it only needs one round of rising time; and the flavor is sublime.  The ground ginger is almost delicate, depending on the taster.  To me, it’s very gingery but not so overwhelming as to put me off.  To my mother, it’s not gingery at all, but just a nice homemade white bread.

If you’re looking for it, here’s the link to the epicurious page with the original recipe.  The same recipe can also be found in Beth Hensperger’s book.  http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/103217

 ~Mikan

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