Cherry Bombe, The Cookbook, a cookbook review

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When I first saw the cover for Cherry Bombe, The Cookbook, my first thought was “is this just a collection of cherry recipes?”  A quick look proved me very, very wrong.

From its website:

Cherry Bombe celebrates women and food through our biannual magazine, the weekly Radio Cherry Bombe podcast, and our Jubilee conference. What rocks our world? Sharing the stories of everyone from industry icons to notable newcomers, encouraging creativity in the kitchen, and bringing the Bombesquad together whenever possible. Our first cookbook, featuring 100+ recipes from 100+ of the most inspiring women around, will be out this October from Clarkson Potter.

Oh.

And per the book’s index, there only appears to be six recipes with cherries in them.  (Just in case you were dying to know.)

So then… what is in this book?  That’s the real question, isn’t it?  I’m happy to report that I literally got the last review copy available from Blogging for Books to satisfy my curiosity and yours.

The thing about this book:  It’s pretty diverse in terms of recipe selection and sophistication.  It makes me really look forward to cooking from this book.  (No recipe testing yet at this time.  My attention is still held by Martha Stewart’s Slow Cooker book.)

The chapters are standard: Mains, Soups and Salads, Sides, Apps/Snacks/Sips, Cookies/Cakes/Pies, and Sweet Treats.

Here’s a sampling of what I’m looking forward to and why:

  • Pink Spaghetti with Beet and Ricotta Sauce – I like beets but rarely cook them.  Plus, this recipes has only 10 ingredients, two of which are salt and boiling water.  It seems very approachable.
  • Filipino Vinegar Chicken – What Filipino food I have, has always been pretty delicious.  I would love to become more familiar with it.
  • Shroomy Cheeseburgers with Maple Thyme Caramelized Onions – Just the title alone sounds amazing.  While more complicated than the burgers I normally make, nothing immediately looks scary or impossible.
  • Chicken Meatballs in Roasted Lemon Broth – The broth is nothing that readily makes sense to me.  Broth ingredients are lemons, olive oil, shallot, bay leaves, cinnamon stick, chicken broth, dried mint, potatoes, cipollini onions, and spinach.  I can’t imagine how this tastes, so I feel the need to make it.
  • Roasted Asparagus and Scallions with Burrata – I recently had dinner at The Amsterdam in Rhinebeck, NY.  My plate was fish with grilled bok choy, grilled scallions, and green goddess dressing.  I was surprised at how mild the grilled scallions were.  I imagine that roasted scallions will the same, and I bet it’s delicious with asparagus and burrata.
  • Best Friend Cheesecake – Overall, it’s a straightforward and basic cheesecake recipe.  That’s not a bad thing.
  • Dad’s Perfect Sweet Potato Pie – Submitted by Joy Wilson, aka Joy the Baker.  Also, sweet potato pie will always be my favorite pie ever.
  • Irish Soda Bread – Interestingly, this falls into the Sweet Treats chapter.  I think it appeals to me just because this recipe is baked in a 9×5 pan.  I like baking in my loaf pan.  I bake a lot of recipes in it that were meant to be muffins and such.

#cherrybombe #cookbook

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Other comments about the physical book, and not the content:  I suspect that the cover will be prone to wear and tear.  I haven’t even owned this book for 24 hours yet, but the corners of the front look like they’ve seen better days.

Every recipe has an accompanying photo.  The general style of the photography reminds me of current day Bon Appetite – a bit more HDR looking, a bit too brightly lit.  It’s not my favorite style, but I know it appeals to others.

As I ponder which cookbooks to cull from my collection, I feel confident that Cherry Bombe will stay in it.  There’s just too many recipes I legitimately want to try.

Related Links:

https://cherrybombe.com/

https://cherrybombe.com/cherry-bombe-the-cookbook/

Disclaimer – I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.  I’m not getting paid for this post.  

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Harvard SEAS lecture 10/17/11, Nandu Jubany and Carles Gaig

(Nandu is on the right; Carles Gaig is on the left.)

It was a quiet evening for a SEAS lecture tonight. I think the room was only 2/3rds full. I suppose it’s because the guest speakers were Nandu Jubany and Carles Gaig, both Spanish chefs without the fame of Jose Andres or Grant Achatz. I say “if you didn’t make it to the lecture, your loss.”

I missed out on Nandu Jubany last year and regretted it. I heard whisperings of his delicious garlic aioli, and when I heard he was returning this year, I was determined to show up.

Recipe #1, from Jubany, milk mayonnaise
**Important – the temperature of your ingredients should be the same.** (since this is a mayo, room temp or slightly colder temps are fine)
300g milk
700g neutral flavored oil (Jubany used sunflower oil)
10g minced chives
10g minced parsley
15g wasabi powder
For hardware – immersion blender and a tall enough container

Throw everything together into your container. In short bursts on low, turn the immersion blender on and off. Gradually, let the immersion blender stay on. Then, you can set it on a higher speed, and slowly move the immersion blender up and down. You want to incorporate the un-blended ingredients sitting at the top at a controlled pace into the blended ingredients at the bottom. When everything is successfully blended, you are done. Continue reading

Cooking from creative, young minds

disclaimer – I don’t know the “who” behind these recipes. All I know is that they were created by young grade school kids (maybe 1st grade?) back in 2000 as a Mother’s Day project.

I was talking about baking with my 7 year old niece in the office building kitchen when a colleague asked me if I wanted to read his friend’s kid’s cookbook.

wha? Ok, I’m game.

Apparently stashed at his desk, Tom quickly produced a stack of photocopied paper showed signs of love and age.

I read every page in “the cookbook.”  And I can’t stop laughing. Here are a couple of my favorites, exactly copied:

RAINBOW ICE CREAM
15 cups of sugar
17 cups of milk
4 eggs
1 cup of red
1 cup of yellow
1 cup of green
1 cup of blue
1 cup of orange
Put in the bowls.  Then you eat it.  First put the ice cream in the fridge then eat it. Continue reading

veggie CSA, no. 3, 2011

(haha, another entry that I’m posting later than I had originally intended.  CSA #4 is tomorrow… I wonder what it will be!)

“Things are still pretty green at the farm. Until the cukes and zucchini start yielding the shares tend to be pretty light and leafy. But lots of goodies on the way: tomatoes and sweet corn are growing steadily, onion are growing up fast, melons are on the way, and sugar snap peas are just around the corner now. This week we’ll be rolling out garlic scapes, the twisty goofy looking flower heads of the garlic plant. 100% of the garlic plant is edible, including the scapes, which need to come off the plant this time of year anyways. If you leave the flower on the plant, it devotes a lot of its energy to seed, which means less for the bulb. By taking off the flower, we redirect the plants’ energy towards growing a big fat bulb at the base, which is what we prefer. Scapes are actually super versatile, taste exactly the same as garlic cloves, but less intense. Use them any way you would normally use garlic. You can also make some bangin’ green pesto with them, or just hit them with olive oil and salt and roast them in the oven like you would asparagus. They mellow out upon roasting and are super tasty just eaten whole.

This is our best guess of what will come in the Stone Soup shares this week.

Please remember that sometimes we can’t harvest exactly what we expect!

Lettuce (head) 1
Garlic Scapes (lb) 0.25
Herbs (bunch) 1
Arugula (bunch) 1”

SE decided to only keep the lettuce. She let me keep the herbs (purple basil), arugula, and garlic scapes. Ok, I called dibs on the garlic scapes, but I would have thought that she wanted the arugula.

Poor arugula, it has been insect-chomped to kingdom come.

So, what did I do with this week’s CSA so far? I decided to take the garlic scapes (I had about 3.3 oz in reality), the basil (about 1 oz.), two handfuls of pine nuts, a pinch of salt, extra virgin olive oil (1/3 c. + 1/4 c.) and squeeze of half a lemon to my blender. Garlic scape pesto! I think I used just a tad too much oil and pine nuts, but that’s ok.

The true taste test?  I took the garlic scape pesto to pasta.  It was very green tasting.  Not in a bad way, but I realize now that I should have added cheese.  Plus, I’m such a basil pesto fan that I found myself wanting to add more basil to my garlic scape pesto.

I have a whole jar of this pesto, so I’ll be trying to think up of other applications.  I think the next one might be pizza.  (^_^)

The leftovers of leftovers

… AKA corned beef and leftovers, part 3

Leftover idea #2? Corned beef hash okayu.


Wait, okayu? Yes, okayu (also known as jook, juk, congee, rice porriage, etc).  This idea is completely my brain child, and it’s one of my better ideas.  (One of my bad ideas?  Purposely swapping 1/3 of the oil for extra virgin olive oil in a brownie recipe out of pure curiosity… yeah, don’t do that.)

Continue reading

Corned beef and leftovers, part 2

So, now that I’ve got about half of the corned beef and cabbage hanging out in my refrigerator, what should I do next?

Leftover dish #1? Corned beef hash.

This was pretty good. The only downside to my hash was that it aggravated my TMJ.  (Was it the hash or the slightly overcooked corned beef that was the culprit? I will not know until next year when I make more). You want equal portions of cooked potatoes and corned beef. My amounts were approximately:

2 cups potatoes (quarter and boil for about 12 minutes before using them in the hash)
2 cups of corned beef
1 bunch of scallions, white parts and some of the green parts (just don’t use any green parts that look sad)
freshly ground black pepper, to taste
(makes about 4 servings)

Continue reading

Avocado Pasta Sauce

Oh, wow… I’m posting something? With pictures?!

This past weekend I made the avocado pasta sauce recipe as found on the Sara Moulton website. I used 3 cups of whole milk rather than four, and used more cheese than originally listed (I had trouble reducing the sauce and still wanted the right texture). I also didn’t have tomatoes on hand. In the future, I’ll probably replace the tomatillas with green bell peppers just because it’s more readily available.

The pasta sauce also makes for a good salad dressing. Yum.

a close up of my dinner

my dinner

Here’s the link to the recipe, http://www.saramoulton.com/recipebox.php?id=76&cat_id=17

~ Mikan