Accountability

For some reason, I think that if I write it down here, publicly, that things will actually get done. (^_^)

– experiment with breakfast pilaf and take photos
– bake bread because I ran out
– plant some microgreens
– get the City Pickers box prepped
– plant okra in said box
– make duck ham
– buy milk and salad greens

A moment of silence for my BlendMaster, Jr. # 5972B

To my much loved Hamilton Beach BlendMaster, Jr. # 5972B,

You were given to me by my second oldest sister back in the days when I was not such a food nerd. I bet you were just a $15-$20 product, but I felt like I was on the road to cooking awesome food when I unwrapped your box. (It was Christmas, I think.) You only had a two year warranty, and, to be honest, I didn’t think you’d last past it.

You were mine before immersion blenders were on everyone’s wedding registry. I think we were at around ten years together. You helped me through dental surgery, *several* times, and I am forever grateful. I thought we’d last into February at least, but it was not to be.

Rest in peace.

 

Please don’t hate me for replacing you with a colorful Cuisinart.

the cookbooks we own

This is the most random post I’ve ever made on this blog. Between my sister (Stealth Eater) and I, there are a lot of cookbooks in our arsenal. Most of the time, our tastes in books do not crossover. Once in a blue moon, they do.

This will be a list of everything we own. I’ll update it whenever appropriate/possible. My sister has more books than I do, or so we think. I have some cookbooks stored in a couple of different places, but the books I’m listing here are on my “current bookshelf.” Maybe I’ll add the other cookbooks at some point.  This list of books is mostly so that we can avoid buying duplicates (which we’ve done!), and start borrowing from each other. (^_^)

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Pumpkin yogurt, or when experiments go well

I finally got around to making yogurt. It’s pretty easy even though the directions can be lengthy. For little ol’ me, who doesn’t eat a lot of yogurt over the course of a week, making a quart of plain yogurt does not save me any money. Chances are that a quart of whole milk costs the same as a quart of plain yogurt at your local market. Factor in labor and the energy your stove took to cook up the yogurt, you realize that it’s not cost effective at all unless you make big batches of yogurt at once.

You would think that this means that I won’t be making yogurt anymore, right? No, not quite.

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bao attempt #1

Many childhood breakfasts, for me, involved mantou (饅頭). The little soft pillows of steamy goodness cycled in and out of my eating rotation, but mostly appeared during weekends. My family never made them (my mother and my grandmother were never interested in cooking anything that seemed complicated). So, we always bought them frozen in Chinatown made by a local company. I always ate them the same way: first by removing the outer skin, and then slowly unrolling with every bite. This ritual was never broken until my mantou stopped being produced in a rolled form. Continue reading

orange cardamom cookies

Honestly, I didn’t eat fabulous things while in Antwerp and in France.  The fanciest meal I had was on my last night there.  I had duck confit, which is one of those dishes that I usually think about ordering but then go order something else.  A couple of the people I was traveling with convinced me to order it (the other choices were salmon and cod).  It was good, and needed the accompanying sauerkraut to help cut the fattiness… but honestly?  Chinese roasted duck, the duck that I grew up with, is much tastier.  The flavor is bolder.  However, the duck confit was wonderfully tender which is something you won’t get with roasted duck.

So, here are my pictures:

Breakfast at Hotel Banks, Antwerp:

(cookie recipe inside this entry)

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